BULLOUS KERATOPATHY

Bullous Keratopathy is a pathological condition in which small vesicles or bullae are formed in the cornea due to endothelial dysfunction. It results from the failure of the endothelium to maintain the normal dehydrated state of the cornea. Basically, it is an eye disorder that involves a fluid filled blister like swelling of the cornea. Symptoms include sensitivity to bright light, blurred vision and intermittent feeling of foreign object in the eye. Normally, this condition can be diagnosed based on the appearance of the patient’s cornea. Bullous Keratopathy is most common in older patients and can occur by itself, may run in families and in some cases occur after eye surgery such as cataract removal.

Treatment options include eye drops to draw out the excess fluid from the cornea, drugs to lower eye pressure and corneal transplant.